Radon Testing

Operating since 2003, our team of Environmental Consultants and Hazardous Materials Surveyors have the experience and expertise to advise and help you manage your hazardous material risks and help you achieve compliance through best practice. 

From radon risk assessments through to executing solutions, we can help you to achieve compliance.

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Health and Safety Risk Assessment Template

Risk Assessments are part of the risk management process and are included in the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations. A Risk Assessment is a process of identifying what hazards currently exist or may appear in the workplace. Utilise our Risk Assessment PDF example and template to help conduct your own Risk Assessment.

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What is radon?

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive element. It is a colourless, odourless and tasteless gas. Radon is found in the atmosphere but tends to accumulate in underground space such as caves, mines and basements. Radon can increase the risk of lung cancer, especially when combined with smoking. Before appropriate ventilation became mandatory, many miners developed lung cancer from radon exposure.

Where can radon be found?

Whilst the highest levels of radon gas are usually found in underground spaces, high concentrations are found in ground floor buildings due to a higher likelihood of a slightly lower pressure than the surrounding atmosphere. This allows radon from subsoil underneath buildings to enter through cracks and gaps in the floor.

Workplaces such as basements, mines, caves and utility industry service ducts can have significant levels of radon as can any above-ground workplaces in radon affected areas. All workplaces including factories, offices, shops, classrooms, nursing homes, residential care homes and health centres can be affected. 

Radon risk reports are required to determine the risk levels of a selected building (NOT the level of radon at the selected address). They are used to estimate the probability of a building being above or below the Action Level for radon. The Action Level refers to the annual average concentration in a home where there is more than 200 becquerels per metre cubed (200 Bq m-3). If the result is a higher probability of radon levels within the selected building then further radon measurements and testing should be conducted in order to reach the radon Target Level. The Target Level of 100 Bq m-3 is the ideal outcome for remediation works in existing buildings and protective measures in new buildings. If the result of a radon assessment is between the Target and Action Levels, action to reduce the level should be seriously considered.

For redevelopment sites, GeoReports provided by the British Geological Survey should be undertaken.

Our Radon Services

  • Radon Surveys - Radon surveys and tests should be conducted in any building where its location and characteristics suggest that elevated levels of radon may be found posing a threat of significant exposure to employees or other persons
  • Radon Risk Assessments - According to the HSE, risk assessments for radon should be carried out in relation to all below ground work places in the UK and all workplaces located in radon affected areas (both below and above ground). Reviews of the risk assessment should be conducted when significant changes are made to the fabric of the building or to works being carried out within the affected building

What are my legal requirements?

As outlined in the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, employers must, so far as is reasonably practicable, ensure the health and safety of employees and others who have access to their work environment.

Employers are required to take action to restrict exposure. It is the responsibility of the HSE and Local Authorities to enforce these regulations.

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